Page 1 of 10 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 96

Thread: Why don't dominicans like cumbia

  1. #1
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    72
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Why don't dominicans like cumbia

    I have noticed this on all my trips to Dominican. That extends to the entire spanish-speaking Caribbean.

    While dominicans do appreciate a good vallenato, Puertoricans and Cubans couldn't give a damn about cumbia or vallenato, unless perhaps, we are talking about Carlos Vives.

    This contrasts heavily with Mexico, El Salvador, Peru, Ecuador, Argentina, Chile; nations that have adopted cumbia and given it their own spin.

    Why is that? Is cumbia too damn slow and boring to caribbean ears? How can that be, cumbia is caribbean. Is it lack of marketing? Or could it be that mexicans and argentines like it because it doesn't seem to be that hard to dance?

  2. #2
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,763
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by colombianLisa View Post
    I have noticed this on all my trips to Dominican. That extends to the entire spanish-speaking Caribbean.

    While dominicans do appreciate a good vallenato, Puertoricans and Cubans couldn't give a damn about cumbia or vallenato, unless perhaps, we are talking about Carlos Vives.

    This contrasts heavily with Mexico, El Salvador, Peru, Ecuador, Argentina, Chile; nations that have adopted cumbia and given it their own spin.

    Why is that? Is cumbia too damn slow and boring to caribbean ears? How can that be, cumbia is caribbean. Is it lack of marketing? Or could it be that mexicans and argentines like it because it doesn't seem to be that hard to dance?
    It is both lack of marketing and lack of good Cumbia singers.

  3. #3
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    872
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    my dominican wife says she doesn't even know what is cumbia,,,,we just had a party at my place the only thing i can remember about the music was that it had to make everybody dance..............if it was slow it was skipped over....

  4. #4
    Silver
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,117
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    First Cumbia hit in DR for ages:

    <iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="640" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/jAq2J22GTFQ" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe>

    Ezequiel hit the nail.

  5. #5
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    72
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ezequiel View Post
    It is both lack of marketing and lack of good Cumbia singers.
    There is plenty of good cumbia in Colombia... and there were some brilliant singers!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuH9JRetATA
    Last edited by colombianLisa; 01-31-2011 at 07:10 PM.

  6. #6
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    72
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by miloskorac View Post
    But Vallenato is Bachata? Only that is the term from Colombia, heard few years before, that all good Bachata hits are made from old Vallenato's hits. And both are sad music from the beach with three guitars.

    Well I don't see similarity between Bachata and Vallenato. Is there any old Bachatero around?
    No, vallenato is a music that was born in the valledupar region of the colombian caribbean, very different from Bachata. Most bachata hits are vallenato covers though.

  7. #7
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,763
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by colombianLisa View Post
    Plenty of good cumbia singers in Colombia, just not lately.
    But not as good as Merengue, Bachata and Salsa singers. (And nobody know them, Carlos Vives is the exception). Lack of marketing.

    You have to keep in mind that the three Spanish speaking Caribbean Islands (Cuba, Dominican Rep, and Puerto Rico) are world super powers when it comes to music, and world class musicians. That's why it is so hard for foreign genre music to penetrate.

  8. #8
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    72
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ezequiel View Post
    But not as good as Merengue, Bachata and Salsa singers. (And nobody know them, Carlos Vives is the exception). Lack of marketing.

    You have to keep in mind that the three Spanish speaking Caribbean Islands (Cuba, Dominican Rep, and Puerto Rico) are world super powers when it comes to music, and world class musicians. That's why it is so hard for foreign genre music to penetrate.
    Of course there are, good is a very subjective term, I would say los diablitos de colombia are millions of light years more talented than Monchy y alejandra (Monchy y Alejandra got famous doing Diablitos covers). You must not be familiar with cumbia if you don't think there are talented singers. Now, marketing, that part of it I agree with you.

    I also agree it is hard to penetrate the caribbean markets, especially Puerto Rico. However, Mexico is also a musical and cultural power of latin america, far greater than all the others, yet they embraced cumbia. Mimi Ibarra is a colombian salsa singer and she is bigger in the DR than any dominican salsero, so the market is not impenetrable, actually colombian salsa is pretty well listened to in the DR. It must boil down to genre, rhythm....

  9. #9
    Silver
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,117
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by colombianLisa View Post
    Of course there are, good is a very subjective term, I would say los diablitos de colombia are millions of light years more talented than Monchy y alejandra (Monchy y Alejandra got famous doing Diablitos covers). You must not be familiar with cumbia if you don't think there are talented singers. Now, marketing, that part of it I agree with you.

    I also agree it is hard to penetrate the caribbean markets, especially Puerto Rico. However, Mexico is also a musical and cultural power of latin america, far greater than all the others, yet they embraced cumbia. Mimi Ibarra is a colombian salsa singer and she is bigger in the DR than any dominican salsero, so the market is not impenetrable, actually colombian salsa is pretty well listened to in the DR. It must boil down to genre, rhythm....
    Colombian Salsa is the no.1 Salsa listened in the DR right now hands down.

  10. #10
    Silver
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    3,358
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ExtremeR View Post
    First Cumbia hit in DR for ages:

    <iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="640" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/jAq2J22GTFQ" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe>

    Ezequiel hit the nail.
    That rhythm is a modern Merengue.

    JJ

Page 1 of 10 123 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •