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Thread: Dirty Dominican (or "Spanish") Jokes?

  1. #1
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    Default Dirty Dominican (or "Spanish") Jokes?

    Does anyone know of or where I can find some very funny dirty Dominican (or Spanish) jokes? I DON'T WANT jokes American's (English-speakers) make about Dominicans (or Latinos), but jokes Dominicans (or Latinos) tell amongst themselves.

    I would prefer that the joke NOT be translated into English, but kept in Spanish. I know the meaning of the joke may be lost when translated, so if possible, could you please provide a brief summary of the story and punchline?


    Thanks,
    Helpmann

  2. #2
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    This is probably not the best place to look for these things...

    Ask your Hispanic friends about the "Loro" Or "Pepito" jokes--these are quick ones.
    Pepito: Maestra?
    Maestra: Sí, Pepito?
    P: Los bombillos se comen?
    M: Pues, no Pepito, ¿porqué me haces esa pregunta?
    P: Porque todas las noches mi Papi dice a mi Mami : "Apaga el bombillo y póngalo en tu boca."

    You might try a Dominican website called www.uepa.com and ask about chistes calientes.

    HB

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hillbilly
    This is probably not the best place to look for these things...

    Ask your Hispanic friends about the "Loro" Or "Pepito" jokes--these are quick ones.
    Pepito: Maestra?
    Maestra: Sí, Pepito?
    P: Los bombillos se comen?
    M: Pues, no Pepito, ¿porqué me haces esa pregunta?
    P: Porque todas las noches mi Papi dice a mi Mami : "Apaga el bombillo y póngalo en tu boca."

    You might try a Dominican website called www.uepa.com and ask about chistes calientes.

    HB
    Do you mean "bombero?"

    BTW: Does anyone know some good "Sankie" or "Puta" jokes that are in Spanish?


    Thanks,
    Helpmann
    Last edited by helpmann; 03-01-2006 at 10:28 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by helpmann
    Do you mean "bombero?"

    BTW: Does anyone know some good "Sankie" or "Puta" jokes that are in Spanish?


    Thanks,
    Helpmann

    bombero = fireman
    bombillo = light (or light bulb)

  5. #5
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    Default Light Bulb?

    Quote Originally Posted by trina
    bombero = fireman
    bombillo = light (or light bulb)
    You think HillBilly meant "lightbulb?"

    -Helpmann

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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by helpmann
    You think HillBilly meant "lightbulb?"

    -Helpmann

    That's what you would turn off if you're going to have sex, right? If you read the joke, it makes sense. The child thinks he's talking about the bulb when he hears "pongalo in tu boca", but obviously, that's the joke, because the father is telling the wife something else.

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    Jokes do not usually translate well if at all.

    Ocassionally I hear a joke that tickles me and I try to translate it into Spanish kind of as a language excersize but I kinda feel sorry for my employees who have to listen to my translated jokes and pretend to be tickled.

    My theory on this is that:

    Humor has been defined as appreciation for the difference between the way things are and the way they should be, the contrast between reality and ideals.

    People who speak English, and people who speak Spanish do not often have the same concept of the way things are, OR of the way they should be, neither the same perception of reality or the same ideals.

    So obviously they are not often going to laugh at the same things.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMike
    Jokes do not usually translate well if at all.

    Ocassionally I hear a joke that tickles me and I try to translate it into Spanish kind of as a language excersize but I kinda feel sorry for my employees who have to listen to my translated jokes and pretend to be tickled.

    My theory on this is that:

    Humor has been defined as appreciation for the difference between the way things are and the way they should be, the contrast between reality and ideals.

    People who speak English, and people who speak Spanish do not often have the same concept of the way things are, OR of the way they should be, neither the same perception of reality or the same ideals.

    So obviously they are not often going to laugh at the same things.

    You're absolutely right. I'm just happy that I'm at a point in my knowledge of the Spanish language that I can appreciate a good joke. It's not only jokes that don't translate well. It's hard to translate a good Spanish love song, because to me, you lose so much in the translation. Songs that are sung in Spanish are often much more powerful. There are also words in Spanish that I wouldn't even know how to translate into English, because I just can't think of an equivalent that says the same thing.
    Last edited by trina; 03-01-2006 at 01:48 PM.

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    Default "Dumb Blonde" Jokes...

    Do "Dumb Blonde" jokes translate well? If not, if the words "Dumb Blonde" were substituted with the word "norteamericana" would the joke be the same, funnier, or less funny?

    -Helpmann

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    Default You're Not Kidding!!

    Quote Originally Posted by MrMike
    Jokes do not usually translate well if at all.

    Ocassionally I hear a joke that tickles me and I try to translate it into Spanish kind of as a language excersize but I kinda feel sorry for my employees who have to listen to my translated jokes and pretend to be tickled.

    My theory on this is that:

    Humor has been defined as appreciation for the difference between the way things are and the way they should be, the contrast between reality and ideals.

    People who speak English, and people who speak Spanish do not often have the same concept of the way things are, OR of the way they should be, neither the same perception of reality or the same ideals.

    So obviously they are not often going to laugh at the same things.
    That's the truth!! Just ask the Danish!!

    -Helpmann

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