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Thread: Process to declare american son

  1. #1
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    Red face Process to declare american son

    Hello everyone!

    My son and I are american citizens, my husband, the babys father, is dominican, and has never declared him as his son and so as we're in the process of me "pidiendolo" we assume having this issue resolved before submitting the application will help him.

    I am curious as to what the exact process looks like as far as $ and papers needed, what do we need to translate and legalize and where do we go and CAN we hire a lawyer for this ( how much$)

    thanks again to anyone who can help!


    LiliB

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    i'm a little confused... but you want to put your husbands name on your son's birth certificate? or you want to get dual citizenship for your son?

    as far as declaring him as a dominican citizen, it would be necessary that dad's name is on the birth certificate. other than that, you can find any lawyer who works with immigration and they can set you up.

  3. #3
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    He's your son? You are a US citizen?
    You take the birth certificate, perhaps a DNA test and you go to the US Consulate and declare him. You obtain a Certificate of Birth...

    You then get a Social Security number and a US Passport.

    I would guess this will cost you close to a thousand dollars.

    No problem regarding the father. He is insignificant.

    HB

    Moderator DR1.com

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    If you are the US citizen and you gave birth in the DR you will need the DR birth certificate mentioned by Hillbilly (make sure it is the correct form) plus proof of residence in the US for a minimum number of years after the age of 18. I don't remember how many years exactly but I believe it was 6 years. These can be things like tax returns, college transcripts etc.

    Granted it was 13 years ago that I did the process for my son but I don't remember it costing anywhere near a thousand dollars for his passport/consulor report of birth abroad/social security card. Prices must have really gone up but that seems to be a trend. Last time I needed extra pages in my passport it was free - now it will cost 80 dollars.

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    Expatsooner: I do believe it is 5 years after the age of 14....in order to transfer citizenship...you are right, it could be an issue.


    HB

    Moderator DR1.com

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    HB: "No problem regarding the father. He is insignificant."

    How true. How true.

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    if the mom is the american and is UNMARRIED, it's one year of physical presence; if she is married then it is FIVE years after 14 years old.

    no dna test if it's the mom - just need to take pictures and proof of pregnancy (hospital records). sometimes they are tough about it -my kids look just like me (even when i declared them) and i had a skeptical consul who didn't believe until she saw me breastfeeding the baby. go figure.

    the process costs about $200 not including the trips to the capital (which is the worst process ever)

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    Quote Originally Posted by abretusojos10 View Post
    Hello everyone!

    My son and I are american citizens, my husband, the babys father, is dominican, and has never declared him as his son and so as we're in the process of me "pidiendolo" we assume having this issue resolved before submitting the application will help him.

    I am curious as to what the exact process looks like as far as $ and papers needed, what do we need to translate and legalize and where do we go and CAN we hire a lawyer for this ( how much$)

    thanks again to anyone who can help!


    LiliB
    Consular Report of Birth Abroad | Embassy of the United States Dominican Republic

    Transmission of American Citizenship

    The law on transmission of American citizenship varies according to whether one or both biological parents are American citizen, and whether the child was born in or out of wedlock.
    Child born abroad to two U.S. Citizens
    A child born outside of the United States or its outlying possessions to parents, both of whom are citizens of the United States, is entitled to citizenship provided one of the parents had, prior to the birth of the child, been resident in the United States or one of its outlying possessions. (No specific period of time is required.)
    Child born abroad to one U.S. Citizen parent and one non U.S. Citizen
    A child born on or after November 14, 1986. A child born outside of the United States to one U.S. citizen parent and one non-U.S. citizen parent may be entitled to citizenship providing the U.S. citizen parent had been physically present in the United States or one of its outlying possessions for five years, at least two years of which were after s/he reached the age of fourteen. This period of physical presence must have taken place prior to the birth of the child.
    A child born between December 24, 1952 and November 13, 1986.A child born outside of the United States to one U.S. citizen parent and one non-U.S. citizen parent, may be entitled to citizenship providing the U.S. citizen parent had, prior to the birth of the child, been physically present in the United States for a period of ten years, at least five years of which were after s/he reached the age of fourteen.
    A child born outside of the United States and out of wedlock to a U.S. citizen mother is entitled to U.S. citizenship providing the U.S. citizen mother had been physically present in the United States for a continuous period of at least one year at some time prior to the birth of her child.
    Child born abroad and out of wedlock to a U.S. Citizen father
    A child born outside of the United States to an U.S. citizen father where there is no marriage to the non-American mother is entitled to U.S. citizenship providing the American citizen father had been physically presentin the United States for the period of time as specified in previous paragraphs for children born in wedlock to one U.S. citizen and one non-U.S. citizen parent.
    The following conditions must also be fulfilled:
    • The father must sign a sworn statement agreeing to provide financial support for the child until s/he reaches the age of 18 years; and...
    ...the following conditions are met:
    • the father provides a written statement acknowledging paternity;
    • or the child is legitimated under local law;
    • or paternity is established by a competent court before the child attains the age of 18 years;
    All of these statements are made by the father using this Affidavit of Paternity form (PDF - 165 Kb). Please download and complete it before coming to the Consulate, but do not sign it. You'll sign it in front of a consular officer at the Consulate. In some unusual cases we may need to request DNA testing to verify parentage.








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  10. #9
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    Consular Report of Birth Abroad | Embassy of the United States Dominican Republic

    How do I declare my child in Santo Domingo?

    If your child has a potential claim to U.S. citizenship, it will be necessary for the U.S. citizen parent to execute an application for a "Consular Report of Birth of an American Citizen Abroad" before a consular officer. If your child is eligible for a Report of Birth, a passport can be obtained at the same time for an additional fee. U.S. citizens can often transmit citizenship to their children born abroad, but the transmission requirements vary depending on when the child was born and the marital status of the U.S. citizen parent. Please view our summary of transmission requirements.
    How do I apply for a Consular Report of Birth Abroad for my child?
    Applying for a Consular Report of Birth Abroad for your child requires only two separate interviews, if you are fully prepared. To schedule your first interview, you must first prepare all the documents and evidence listed on the Consular Report of Birth checklist (PDF - 240 Kb). Incomplete applications will result in delays and additional required appointments.
    Once you have obtained all of the information go to our online appointment system to make an appointment for the first interview.
    Helpful Hints for Appointments:
    • Make your appointment early. Slots can fill up quickly.
    • If you don't have an email address for the required field, just enternone@hotmail.com. We prefer that you enter an e-mail address, however, it will help us notify you should there be unforeseen circumstances that affect your appointment. We will not share your e-mail address, and it will be automatically deleted from our appointment system after your appointment date.
    • Print out a copy of your appointment confirmation and bring it with you.
    • If necessary, you can cancel an appointment through the online booking system.
    First Interview:
    On the day of the interview, one parent or legal guardian should come to the consular section. Please arrive approximately (15) fifteen minutes before the appointment time so that you are ready to clear security and enter the waiting area at your appointment time. Appointments are subject to cancellation for applicants who arrive more than (15) fifteen minutes after their scheduled time. The child does not need to attend this first interview. It is very important that applicants be prepared to pay the $205.00 fee for the Report of Birth and passport applications prior to the interview. Applicants who do not pay can not be interviewed and will have to reschedule Please bring all the documents and evidence listed on theChecklist (PDF - 240 Kb). Consular staff will review these documents. You will then be told what additional documentation is required and be given a date for a second appointment.
    Second Interview:
    For the second interview, both parents and the child must be present. If the parent has authorized another individual to represent him/her per the notarized consent form, that person must be part of the interview. Due to limited space in our waiting room, no one other than these individuals will be allowed entry to the consular building. After entering the consular building and proceeding to the American Citizen Services lobby, you will be asked to present your copy of the payment receipt you were given after paying the fee at the first interview, and provide your appointment sheet and recent passport photos of the child. A consular officer will then review your documents and interview you to determine whether your child qualifies for a Report of Birth. If you are properly prepared and your child qualifies, the officer can approve the Report of Birth and passport application the same day. You will be asked to pay the Domex office on our premises a fee for the delivery of the Report of Birth and passport. These are usually prepared and dispatched within one month of your second interview.

  11. #10
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    This is the part that I knew about. A child born between December 24, 1952 and November 13, 1986.A child born outside of the United States to one U.S. citizen parent and one non-U.S. citizen parent, may be entitled to citizenship providing the U.S. citizen parent had, prior to the birth of the child, been physically present in the United States for a period of ten years, at least five years of which were after s/he reached the age of fourteen.

    But I see that there have been a lot of changes which I guess circumstances/realities have forced the authorities to make.

    Thanks for that good post Ezequiel.

    HB

    Moderator DR1.com

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