Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 69

Thread: Rottweiler in La Mulata

  1. #31
    Regular
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    110
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I don't disagree with your last post. I have over 25 years of active experience in dog rescue work, starting with the jackoffs who used to leave boxes of kittens and puppies at the end of the lane to our horse yard up to and including working in Bali with street dog rescue groups (believe me, the Balinese street dog problem is far more severe than anything in the DR), being actively involved with puppy mill raids, rescue, rehabilitation, rehoming and transportation of rescue dogs in Canada and across borders and personally rehoming successfully over 500 dogs in 25 years.

    There is no need to be patronizing. It was a simple statement and certainly nothing to go on the defensive about. I understand you are questioning the ability of the rescuer to provide for this dog over the long term. It's a viable point and I never disputed it. But my point was that for some rescuers, myself included, the fact that he is older, has been subjected to abuse and has fought valiantly to survive is all the more reason to put more effort into saving him.

    Ella

  2. #32
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    111
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Practically I can provide for this dog in terms of care. Financially I can't. There may be people outside the country who would like to help him but for geographical reasons can't. To me, they are the ones who might be willing to sponsor him. I already have several sponsored animals in my rescue foundation. You are right, sponsors do fall away, but help comes and the horses, donkeys, dogs, cats, rabbits, turtles, chickens and ducks, all rescued, never go short. Some sometimes get fostered or re-homed. It is a matter of faith and trust. I have learned never to take in a new animal unless there is a sponsor. How I wish that were different! It would be if more people put their money where their mouth is and I have been blessed to see exactly that with regard to pledges and money coming in to pay for this dog's care with Dr Bob. It is perhaps one thing with which I agreed with Mrs Thatcher, 'If there is a problem, DO SOMETHING about it!'
    Many of our animals have been abused or are old and may not live long. Our first horse, dying when we took him in, lasted almost 6 years. He taught many children and adults about kindness, compassion, commitment, responsibility, stoicism, laughter, how to handle a large animal and much more. To the last he fought to live. Almost till the end he loved to be ridden for 10 minutes occasionally by someone very light. He would hold his head so proudly and prance along! Our last elderly rescued donkey only lasted 8 months, but he spent that time, after his initial emergency care with us, in peace and with a foster carer who loved him dearly. This rottweiler has major neurological problems, maybe from the effects of where the bullet embedded itself, maybe from tetanus from the wound, maybe from something previous which could even be why someone shot him rather than taking him to be euthanized. I have nursed many hopeless cases when it came to animals. One cat had been burned or had boiling water or oil thrown over him and he had salmonella so badly he was screaming with pain and couldn't even get to the litter tray. It was Dr Bob who got him well when another vet had actually given him a drug which could have sent him blind. Five years later, apart from the bald area, he is totally magnificent and deeply affectionate. One beautiful briard, abandoned by her owners, was majorly epileptic, almost certainly the result of indiscriminate breeding. She had 6 months of love and care with me and the people who support me. Many people cried when she finally had to be euthanized after 36 fits in 48 hours. She was the most centred animal I have ever encountered. She had been horribly neglected before, pretty much kept in a dungeon, never medicated for her epilepsy... If I can give that love and care to an animal at the end of its life, it has to be worthwhile. One GS / Dominican cross bled out in front of me, presumably from cancer, for several hours while I waited for the vet. I just sat with him all that time and stroked him. He died in peace. I was called to help with another dying from testicular cancer. It wasn't his time, but I showed the locals how to nurse him, give him his dignity. Animals tell me when it is their time and I am just privileged to share that with them. It is called caring.
    I have also re-homed many animals in the years I have been on this island.
    Believe me, it isn't always the Dominicans who treat animals barbarically or who abandon them because they are ill or out of hand!
    No, we can't change the world for all of these animals, but together we can do it for a few. We do what we can.

  3. #33
    Regular
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    110
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you for such an eloquent post.

  4. #34
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    111
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thank you too to those of you who support me in this. Clearly the ideal solution for this rotti would be a loving home where he can be a one man dog, but we need a solution and what I can offer might be a second best. One thing animals never lack with us is love.

  5. Likes sabra, Givadogahome, young seniors liked this post
  6. #35
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    111
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Dr Bob is planning to do Buck's surgery tomorrow, so please send him loving, healing thoughts...
    Yesterday, Buck walked the length of his run, albeit very unsteadily because of his neurological problems probably from the bullet, to greet me. That is HUGE progress!

  7. Likes rendul, KateP, sabra, Givadogahome, AlterEgo liked this post
  8. #36
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    111
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Dr Bob decided not to operate. He considers that he has made such wonderful progress that it is not worth putting him through surgery for cosmetic reasons. He's already had to cut away most of his ear anyway and without a CAT scan [unavailable for animals here] I suspect it could be pretty risky digging around inside and possibly causing more neurological damage... The pellets are gradually working their way to the surface. Dr Bob stopped counting at 25!
    Now we need to make plans for his long-term future. Is there anyone willing to adopt him? He is a sweet-natured fellow, but he does have neurological problems, presumably from all this, and he is only likely to live a couple more years at most... As it is, he is a walking [unsteadily] miracle.
    Otherwise, he is looking for sponsors who will help him to live in peace with me for the rest of his time. He will have his own little garden where he will see people and sometimes he can spend time in the main garden or house with the females as long as the other males are tied up or penned for a while. I know there are some of you out there who are either abroad or who love dogs but can't have a dog where you live here.... Will you help him? If so, please send me a private message. A BIG WOOFING THANK YOU FROM BUCK! I don't think he can quite bark again yet, but he does manage to whine his appreciation.

  9. #37
    Regular
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    110
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Sent you a PM, Isobel.

    Thanks,

    Ella

  10. #38
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    111
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Please contact me again, Ella. Your PM never arrived and I've had no success at sending my own PMs either.

    Buck is ready to go home! He is still convalescing and will probably always walk like a stroke survivor, but he is bright and cheerful and interested in what is going on around him again. He is ready for the next phase of what remains of his life.

  11. Likes rendul, KateP liked this post
  12. #39
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    111
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I took our youngest member to be speyed today in readiness for Buck's arrival. He is still intact and though Dr Bob doesn't think he has got it in him, I'm sure there is life in the old dog yet, so I am not willing to take the risk! He saw me arrive with the youngster and sulked, or it seemed that way! I don't suppose he was too impressed to see me take her home with me tonight either.... How can he understand that by Wednesday he will hopefully be coming home too once we have got his garden fenced off and his little house made? Is there anyone else out there who will contribute to his ongoing living expenses to lighten the load on thos who have volunteered? 10 -15 dollars a month would be such a help. Thank you.

  13. #40
    Silver
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    4,264
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Why don't you open a Bucks paypal account and people can send money if and when they feel the need to give something back. I think many people don't like commitment but would send money on spec if they had a win at the casino or a reasonably cheap month. Just somewhere people can click on and transfer without having to contact you and go down that hassle for the sakes of donating a few bucks, which to some might feel cheap, but it all helps. Open a blog for him and his progress so people can feel part of his comeback.

  14. Likes rendul, robbie, Celt202, young seniors liked this post
Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst ... 23456 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •