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Thread: Barrio San Carlos de Tenerife??

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    Default Barrio San Carlos de Tenerife??

    Any historians on DR1??

    Can anyone tell me where the Barrio San Carlos de Tenerife is/was in Santo Domingo back in the 1700s-1800s? It was founded and settled by Spaniards from Tenerife in the Canary Islands in the 1600s under its own juristiction, and eventually became part of the capital.

    I know there's a San Carlos north end of the city, is that it? What are the boundaries?

    AE

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    Default This might help.......

    Quote Originally Posted by AlterEgo View Post
    Any historians on DR1??

    Can anyone tell me where the Barrio San Carlos de Tenerife is/was in Santo Domingo back in the 1700s-1800s? It was founded and settled by Spaniards from Tenerife in the Canary Islands in the 1600s under its own juristiction, and eventually became part of the capital.

    I know there's a San Carlos north end of the city, is that it? What are the boundaries?

    AE
    San Carlos Map | Dominican Republic Google Satellite Maps

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlterEgo View Post
    Any historians on DR1??

    Can anyone tell me where the Barrio San Carlos de Tenerife is/was in Santo Domingo back in the 1700s-1800s? It was founded and settled by Spaniards from Tenerife in the Canary Islands in the 1600s under its own juristiction, and eventually became part of the capital.

    I know there's a San Carlos north end of the city, is that it? What are the boundaries?

    AE
    It's directly east of the Palacio Nacional and west of the Barrio Chino. The original church built by the settlers is still standing and possibly in use.

    The neighborhood is still called San Carlos, currently home to lower middle class/working class people.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post
    It's directly east of the Palacio Nacional and west of the Barrio Chino. The original church built by the settlers is still standing and possibly in use.

    The neighborhood is still called San Carlos, currently home to lower middle class/working class people.
    Thanks r&b, NALS, I knew that's where San Carlos is today, I thought I read something that indicated San Carlos de Tenerife encompassed a much larger area in the "old days", but maybe I'm mistaken. I've been working on my suegra's ancestry so I can surprise her with a family tree - so far I'm back to 1700s, and everyone lived there into the 1800s [San Carlos] and I presume they came from Tenerife in the Canary Islands. One grandmother was born in Banica [Haitian border, I had to find it on a map!] in the 1700s, and I found out that town was also settled by people from the Canary Islands, but they totally abandoned the town [time of Haitian rule?] - that grandmother married in San Carlos so I guess that's where a lot of them moved?

    AE

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlterEgo View Post
    I knew that's where San Carlos is today, I thought I read something that indicated San Carlos de Tenerife encompassed a much larger area in the "old days"
    I doubt it was much bigger than the current neighborhood (in fact, the current neighborhood may be bigger that what the original San Carlos was). Remember that Santo Domingo has always been the largest city in the Spanish colony and then in the country, and the city didn't spilled over the walls (Ciudad Nueva) until the Lilis dictatorship, a good century or so after San Carlos was founded. The current San Carlos is more or less the same size as the Colonial Zone, so it couldn't be bigger than it is right now.

    Quote Originally Posted by AlterEgo
    One grandmother was born in Banica [Haitian border, I had to find it on a map!] in the 1700s, and I found out that town was also settled by people from the Canary Islands, but they totally abandoned the town [time of Haitian rule?] - that grandmother married in San Carlos so I guess that's where a lot of them moved?
    Bánica today is near the Haitian border, but when she was born the Haitian (well, in that time it was the French) border was much further to the west because the colony of Saint Domingue only consisted of the western coast of the island and the Tiburón peninsula (the long southern one), the rest of the island was Spanish and later Dominican territory. It was not until the early 20th century that the current border was settled.

    Also, most historic towns in the current Dominican Republic were settled by Canary Islanders, including towns that today are deep into Haitian territory but at the time of their founding until the early 20th Century were within the Spanish colony/Dominican Republic.

    A few examples of the originally Spanish/Dominican towns that were incorporated into Haití: Hincha (today called Hinche), Las Caobas (it's name was not changed to French), San Miguel de Atalaya (St Michel de L'Atalaye), San Rafael (today Saint Raphael) and a large number of other current "Haitian" towns were originally founded by Canary Islanders. Note that San Rafael is extremely deep into Haitian territory, much closer to current Gonaives than to Elías Piña, which is indicative of how much land was given to the Haitians.

    Most of the descendants of the founding families moved further east (many others moved to Cuba/Puerto Rico/Venezuela, especially when the British lost their grip and Touissant took over many of them), a large number of families settled through out the DR, especially in Baní and surrounding areas.

    The Santana family (Pedro Santana, et al) settled as far east as El Seibo, the Cabral family settled in Baní, the Guzmán family (which, by the way, is the only Dominican family to had been granted a nobility title and coat of arms by the royal family of Spain, albeit today the DR technically doesn't recognizes nobility titles) settled in Moca; so on and so forth.

    Then there are the myriad of towns that are still in Dominican control that were settled by the Canary Islanders, such as Samaná, Puerto Plata (remember that the original Puerto Plata was abandoned when the crown decided to depopulate much of the island to put an end to the contraband, which, of course, that allowed the French to take a hold on Tortuga Island and the rest is history; then it was resettled with Canary Islanders), Sabana de la Mar, Montecristi, Dajabón, San Juan de la Maguana, so on and so forth.

    By the way, the original colonial church that was built in Bánica is still standing. It's not much of a building, but it's there and your grandmother (and other family members) was probably baptized there, who knows! I highly doubt there might be any records that could verify if your grandmother et al. were baptized there, because during the Haitian invasion of 1805 (and in other invasions), they did quite a job at massacring a good deal of the population, setting fire to almost every major town the troops passed through and in the process destroying all types of records ranging from property titles to baptisms to everything else one can imagine. All because the Haitian leaders that pretended to be pseudo-imperialists lost their tempers when they couldn't capture Santo Domingo and ordered the indiscriminate killing of anyone that was white while they were marching back to Haití.
    Last edited by NALs; 10-09-2010 at 08:23 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post
    I doubt it was much bigger than the current neighborhood (in fact, the current neighborhood may be bigger that what the original San Carlos was). Remember that Santo Domingo has always been the largest city in the Spanish colony and then in the country, and the city didn't spilled over the walls (Ciudad Nueva) until the Lilis dictatorship, a good century or so after San Carlos was founded. The current San Carlos is more or less the same size as the Colonial Zone, so it couldn't be bigger than it is right now.

    Bánica today is near the Haitian border, but when she was born the Haitian (well, in that time it was the French) border was much further to the west because the colony of Saint Domingue only consisted of the western coast of the island and the Tiburón peninsula (the long southern one), the rest of the island was Spanish and later Dominican territory. It was not until the early 20th century that the current border was settled.

    Also, most historic towns in the current Dominican Republic were settled by Canary Islanders, including towns that today are deep into Haitian territory but at the time of their founding until the early 20th Century were within the Spanish colony/Dominican Republic.

    A few examples of the originally Spanish/Dominican towns that were incorporated into Haití: Hincha (today called Hinche), Las Caobas (it's name was not changed to French), San Miguel de Atalaya (St Michel de L'Atalaye), San Rafael (today Saint Raphael) and a large number of other current "Haitian" towns were originally founded by Canary Islanders. Note that San Rafael is extremely deep into Haitian territory, much closer to current Gonaives than to Elías Piña, which is indicative of how much land was given to the Haitians.

    Most of the descendants of the founding families moved further east (many others moved to Cuba/Puerto Rico/Venezuela, especially when the British lost their grip and Touissant took over many of them), a large number of families settled through out the DR, especially in Baní and surrounding areas.

    The Santana family (Pedro Santana, et al) settled as far east as El Seibo, the Cabral family settled in Baní, the Guzmán family (which, by the way, is the only Dominican family to had been granted a nobility title and coat of arms by the royal family of Spain, albeit today the DR technically doesn't recognizes nobility titles) settled in Moca; so on and so forth.

    Then there are the myriad of towns that are still in Dominican control that were settled by the Canary Islanders, such as Samaná, Puerto Plata (remember that the original Puerto Plata was abandoned when the crown decided to depopulate much of the island to put an end to the contraband, which, of course, that allowed the French to take a hold on Tortuga Island and the rest is history; then it was resettled with Canary Islanders), Sabana de la Mar, Montecristi, Dajabón, San Juan de la Maguana, so on and so forth.

    By the way, the original colonial church that was built in Bánica is still standing. It's not much of a building, but it's there and your grandmother (and other family members) was probably baptized there, who knows! I highly doubt there might be any records that could verify if your grandmother et al. were baptized there, because during the Haitian invasion of 1805 (and in other invasions), they did quite a job at massacring a good deal of the population, setting fire to almost every major town the troops passed through and in the process destroying all types of records ranging from property titles to baptisms to everything else one can imagine. All because the Haitian leaders that pretended to be pseudo-imperialists lost their tempers when they couldn't capture Santo Domingo and ordered the indiscriminate killing of anyone that was white while they were marching back to Haití.
    Very interesting NALS, thank you. She had what sounds to me more like a French surname: Blanchard. She married a Piantini from Italy in San Carlos.

    AE

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlterEgo View Post
    She had what sounds to me more like a French surname: Blanchard.
    It sounds French, because it is French.

    I don't know much about the Blanchard, other than there are at least two Blanchard Dominican families (one is white, the other mulatto).

    However, I did found the following regarding the Blanchard in Haití (and Saint Domingue) which could have direct implications regarding the Piantini-Blanchard connection. Apparently the name first appeared on the island (in Saint Domingue) in the early to mid 1700s, and there appears to be a connection with possible branches in Arcadia (eastern Canada) and Louisiana in USA. Whatever Blanchards on the Haitian side of the island must be either white or mulatto, given that I haven't noticed anything about a Blanchard owning slaves, but who knows! Also, there is (or was prior to the earthquake) a neighborhood in Port-au-Prince named Blanchard, this could be indicative of such family (or a branch of such) having high social status in colonial, and possibly post-colonial, Saint Domingue.

    I don't know much else. You should try to contact the people responsible for the following links:

    Familles d'Haiti et de Saint Domingue

    The Cajuns in Saint Domingue (1764-1788)

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    Ah, so the mystery deepens. I will contact both people and see what turns up. Not too much about Blanchard in Familias Dominicanas, guess they weren't very prolific, or they got wiped out by the Haitians. His Blanchard ancestor was probably born in the 1790s-1800, a child when the conflict began, and probably how she ended up in Santo Domingo from Banica.

    Thanks for your help

    AE

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