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Thread: Question on travel from Haiti to DR

  1. #1
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    Default Question on travel from Haiti to DR

    Is it possible now to purchase tickets from either Capital Coach Line or any other bus line from Haiti to DR? My 5 family members have no way of getting their money. I just bought 5 airline tickets for them to fly out of Las Americas to New York since they have visas.

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    At 5pm today (Monday 18th Jan) I had a conversation with a friend in PAP and she is coming out of PAP to Santo Domingo on Friday on Caribbean Tours. Apparently they are now running 2 to 3 buses per day.

    I've not confirmed this but she apparently has 2 tickets.

    Try Caribbean Tours HQ in Santo Domingo for concrete info.

    Best of luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beamah332is View Post
    Is it possible now to purchase tickets from either Capital Coach Line or any other bus line from Haiti to DR? My 5 family members have no way of getting their money. I just bought 5 airline tickets for them to fly out of Las Americas to New York since they have visas.
    MODS please move to EArthquake thread

    I tried Caribe Tours and they have no office in PAP now

    will try Capital Coach and perhaps other DR!ers can try Terra or whatever it is

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    Just spoke with CApital Coach

    27 de Febrero, #455
    Tel.809.530.8266

    You CAN BUY the Tickets Here in SD

    Buses leave from Tabarre every morning at 10 am
    Cost $40

    They have no way to accept international payments for this

    So you need to get cash to their office here

    do you have friends or family here in SD that can do this for you?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainannie View Post
    Just spoke with CApital Coach

    27 de Febrero, #455
    Tel.809.530.8266

    You CAN BUY the Tickets Here in SD

    Buses leave from Tabarre every morning at 10 am
    Cost $40

    They have no way to accept international payments for this

    So you need to get cash to their office here

    do you have friends or family here in SD that can do this for you?
    Unfortunately, I do not have any friends or family in SD.
    I'm desperate... I'm thinking about flying out to SD Wednesday just to pay for their bus fare.

  6. #6
    Nesitor aguien ke me ame en berda
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    since this seems pretty urgent, i'm wiling to receive the money in the US and go to the bus office and pay it locally. you'll have to go on trust i'm afraid, but i've been around for a while.

    i have US banking and can receive paypal. i can do this as soon as the funds clear.
    Last edited by Robert; 01-27-2010 at 09:18 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Bye View Post
    since this seems pretty urgent, i'm wiling to receive the money in the US and go to the bus office and pay it locally. you'll have to go on trust i'm afraid, but i've been around for a while.

    i have US banking and can receive paypal. i can do this as soon as the funds clear.

    email me at haiti@tasdevil.com if you need this.
    trust him... my paypal is full up with donations and I have not figured out how to lift the limits

  8. #8
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    Default Hope this helps

    Quote Originally Posted by mountainannie View Post
    Just spoke with CApital Coach

    27 de Febrero, #455
    Tel.809.530.8266

    You CAN BUY the Tickets Here in SD

    Buses leave from Tabarre every morning at 10 am
    Cost $40

    They have no way to accept international payments for this

    So you need to get cash to their office here

    do you have friends or family here in SD that can do this for you?
    Here's the Wall Street Journal describing the experience of a pair of Haitian-American, who first flew into SDQ, taking that bus today, ...

    Dispatch - WSJ

    Finding Marc’s Family: Readying for the Bus Ride
    By Gina Chon



    Marc waited for the bus to leave from Santo Domingo to Haiti on Monday morning.

    As thousands of Haitians flee the capital of Port-au-Prince, Marc Henry Bigot of Miami is going in to rescue what is left of his family. Wall Street Journal reporter Gina Chon is accompanying Marc on his journey. Follow his story here on [the Wall Street Journal's Dispatch blog], and on Facebook.

    * * *

    At breakfast at the hotel before Marc departed for the bus station, the room [at Barcelo Hotel] was filled with aid workers headed to Haiti.


    Marc waited for the bus to leave from Santo Domingo to Haiti on Monday morning.
    There were medics from New York and a Benelux Red Cross contingent, in addition to the Israeli aid workers from last night. Marc and Marie were the only Haitians in the room and they went unnoticed. The aid workers were busy discussing their own arrangements.

    “I guess everyone wants to go to Haiti,” Marc said with a smile.

    Outside the hotel, the relief workers gathered near a bus they were taking to Haiti. Marc and Marie headed to a taxi to get to the bus station in time for the ticket booth opening at 8 a.m.

    At the bus station, there were only four other people waiting to go to Haiti. An advertisement for the Capital Coach Line bus promised panoramic views and first class service. It turned out the one-way trip was only $40
    , but tax was an additional $27.

    As the departure hour of 10 a.m. approached, the bus station steadily filled with people. By 9 a.m., there were about two dozen people and the room started to fill with suitcases. There was a Haitian man from New Jersey searching for family members and another who works for the UN in Haiti. He works in the Public Information Office and said one of the 12 colleagues in his department was killed, but the others made it.

    Marc spent the waiting time chatting with the other travelers and smoking. He didn’t get much sleep the night before and said he now felt tired because the end was finally near.
    “I have the ticket in my hand so now I feel some relief,” he said. “I’m almost there.”
    Finding Marc’s Family: On the Bus to Port-au-Prince

    Delays.

    Thirty people waited anxiously to take the bus from Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic to the Haitian capital Port-au-Prince, but first the bus had to be fixed. That pushed back the departure time by more than an hour.

    It took another half hour to load all the suitcases on the bus. Knowing they would find little food or water in Haiti, everyone had brought cases of water, bulk-sized packages of cornflakes and fruit. One man even brought a cooler.

    As the suitcases were loaded on the bus, which looked similar to a Greyhound vehicle, Marc smoked. He knew once he was on the bus, he wouldn’t be able to have a cigarette for quite a while.

    “Smoking relaxes me, and I’ve been too nervous since the earthquake,” Marc said. “I just want to see my girls.”

    The trip is scheduled to take more than five hours, and it arrives in the heart of Port-au-Prince. Most of the passengers are Haitians, and they talked about loved ones they hoped to find.

    One American volunteer, who only gave his first name, Nick, was bringing in medical supplies to an orphanage. He said he was scared. “I’ve never been to a Third World country before,” the 20-year-old from Idaho said. “I don’t know what to expect.”

    Finally, at 11:30 a.m., an hour and a half after the scheduled 10:00 a.m. departure time, the bus pulled out of the station. Some passengers chatted quietly, but Marc and many others took the opportunity to rest. Shortly after boarding the bus, Marc fell asleep.

    The bus is scheduled to arrive in Port au Prince after 5 p.m.
    Finding Marc’s Family: At the Border Crossing

    On the road leading to the Dominican-Haitian border, there was no sign of the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that devastated Port-au-Prince less than a week ago. Trees, shrubs and palm trees filled the landscape, and every now and then there was a home. Cows grazed on patches of grass.

    Marc got excited when he saw Étang Saumâtre, Haiti’s largest lake, which lies just on the Haitian side of the border. “Look, it’s the lake!” Marc said as he pointed to the right. “That means we’re getting close” to the border crossing.

    Just before the border was a lone gas station where a makeshift parking lot had formed as people waited in line to buy fuel, so precious and scarce in Haiti. Small stands on the side of the road sold water and other supplies.

    Marie Cherie, an old acquaintance of Marc’s who is also seeking her own relatives, began alternately clapping her hands and singing a tune. Marc just strained his neck to look out both windows, not wanting to miss anything.

    The border crossing sits along the shore of Étang Saumâtre, and there passengers saw their first possible sign of the temblor. Some of the cement structures were half under water, while parts some wooden shacks had collapsed.

    On the narrow road, a steady stream of pickup trucks, sedans and SUVs that had just left Haiti tried to navigate past Marc’s bus. The area teemed with buses, trucks and cars, and Marc’s bus constantly honked, trying to get by. Crowds of people gathered in pockets, while boys hawked snacks, drinks and cell phone scratch cards.

    At the border crossing gate, a line of cars waited to get into Haiti. Many of them carried supplies purchased in the Dominican Republic. Soldiers carrying machine guns stopped each vehicle to ask questions.

    Rachelle Sienthelie sat on some gauze-like cloth on the ground near the gate, her right leg in a cast. She was on the top floor of a building when the earthquake hit, she said, and she broke her hip. She had heard doctors in Santo Domingo would help her, and, indeed, they put her leg in a cast. Now she waited for a taxi to take her back to Haiti.

    On Marc’s bus, the passengers were led off and sent to the immigration office. It was hot, crowded and chaotic. Dozens of people waited in line, and passengers asked each other what they should be doing.

    After a few minutes, one of the bus employees handling the immigration process for the passengers told everyone to return to the bus. “It’s too busy in here and it’s better for everyone to get back on the bus,” she shouted in Creole
    You can the Dispatch blog tomorrow at for the next installment.


    Marc stayed with his acquaintance, Marie, in Santo Domingo before leaving for Haiti.
    Last edited by aegap; 01-18-2010 at 08:30 PM.

  9. #9
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    Luckily they have found a way and i have booked a hotel room for them at a hotel there near the airport. They can then fly out to NY on Friday.

  10. #10
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    good report from the WSJ

    I sent a friend of mine Michael Deibert in from France, over to join them

    only ONE correction

    the buses do NOT go into the heart of PAP

    they go into the terminal at Tabarre near the us embassy about 7 miles from town...

    when i traveled that root this year we had to hitch practically in a pick up truck, not even a tap tap since everyone was met with cars'

    please keep posting

    and glad those Haitians have gotten out!

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